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'J.C.' - The Omnipresent Oracle

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Re: 'J.C.' - The Omnipresent Oracle

Postby Orange14 » Mon Apr 20, 2015 7:23 pm

I think the issues at Ajax will be sorted out soon enough. Additionally, the article favors the Feyenoord youth academy too much. The current Ajax youth are doing just fine and this is because of what Cruyff has instituted. Nelom, Velhena and Boetius have not achieved their early promise at Feyenoord and are all substitutes these days.
Appie Nouri will forever be remembered for his grace and humanity on and off the pitch!
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Re: 'J.C.' - The Omnipresent Oracle

Postby Tom_ » Mon Apr 20, 2015 8:55 pm

Yeah, it makes some reasonable points but it's also quite dramatic in parts.

Personally I don't see what JC helicoptering in from the golf course in Majorca or whatever can do for us here. Firstly I'm not sure if he even watches Ajax games. In any case the problems with our football are pretty obvious and it doesn't look great for the current management if they need an outside consultant to work it out. Lastly I thought the ultra defensive tactics were a cornerstone of the JC & friends 'revolution' in the first place?
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Re: 'J.C.' - The Omnipresent Oracle

Postby ajaxusa » Wed Jul 29, 2015 7:58 am

Here's a pretty amazing blog post by Mr. Simon Kuper.

Johan Cruyff, father of modern soccer, fades on the sidelines
Mark it 8, Dude.
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Re: 'J.C.' - The Omnipresent Oracle

Postby Tom_ » Wed Jul 29, 2015 6:02 pm

Thanks for posting Jim. Seems people are getting increasingly fed up with this guy.

I giggled at this bit: "As the old man sits in his mansion watching TV (with the sound turned off so that he can give the commentary himself)..."
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Re: 'J.C.' - The Omnipresent Oracle

Postby SPL » Thu Oct 22, 2015 12:13 pm

Announced by Barcelona today sad news JC has lung cancer.No details of how bad it is. Hope the great man can win this battle.One of the greatest players ever and surely one of the most influential.
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Re: 'J.C.' - The Omnipresent Oracle

Postby Dubbel » Thu Oct 22, 2015 3:30 pm

Awful tidings from Spain. Let's hope for the best.
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Re: 'J.C.' - The Omnipresent Oracle

Postby Philippe » Thu Nov 26, 2015 10:02 am

For those who understand french, there's an interesting book about J.C. published in September : « Johan Cruijff, génie pop et despote », by Chérif Ghemmour. The author is a French journalist specialist in Dutch football (rare and valuable :biggthumpup.gif: ). I interviewed him for my fansite : http://ajaxfr.com/livre_sur_cruijff.html
Appie, stay strong !
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Re: 'J.C.' - The Omnipresent Oracle

Postby souras84 » Thu Mar 24, 2016 1:42 pm

I just read the announcment of Johan Cruyff's passing... May he rest in peace :ajax.gif:
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Re: 'J.C.' - The Omnipresent Oracle

Postby Orange14 » Thu Mar 24, 2016 2:11 pm

RIP #14 and may your countenance continue to shine down from the heavens above. You were one of the greatest influences on modern day football both as a player and a manager. While we will not have you in person, the clips of your goals and the legacy of your spirit both at Ajax and Barcelona will live on!!!!
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Re: 'J.C.' - The Omnipresent Oracle

Postby SPL » Thu Mar 24, 2016 2:21 pm

RIP to the greatest of all footballers and the most influential.He is and always will be Ajax.His influence is why I am an Ajax fan from England ,simply magical to watch as a player.
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Re: 'J.C.' - The Omnipresent Oracle

Postby Amol » Thu Mar 24, 2016 3:03 pm

Just read the shocking news this morning. Rest in peace JC.
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Re: 'J.C.' - The Omnipresent Oracle

Postby ajaxusa » Thu Mar 24, 2016 3:19 pm

I never saw him play. I never met him (though he did wink at me once from a balcony of De Toekomst). But his influence on Ajax, and on football, was immense. My son Ryan has only ever worn #14 in homage to the legend. He epitomized greatness and originality. :ajaxscarf.gif:
Mark it 8, Dude.
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Re: 'J.C.' - The Omnipresent Oracle

Postby Dave the mac » Thu Mar 24, 2016 3:32 pm

I read the news here first, a dark day. Cruyff also was the reason I started following Dutch football and Ajax in particular. He will be missed.
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Re: 'J.C.' - The Omnipresent Oracle

Postby Orange14 » Thu Mar 24, 2016 3:56 pm

I saw him play once in Holland when he was at Ajax and several times when he played for the Washington Diplomats. Here are some famous Cruyff sayings:

“Every disadvantage has its advantage”
"I don't make a lot of mistakes because it is hard for me to be wrong."
“Before I make a mistake I see it coming and don’t make the mistake.”
“They can never beat you but you can lose to them.”
“Football is a simple game but it is very hard to play it simple.”
“Football is a game of time and space.”
“Playing against 10 is harder than playing against 11.”
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Re: 'J.C.' - The Omnipresent Oracle

Postby Philippe » Thu Mar 24, 2016 3:56 pm

Words can't express how sad I feel. RIP Johan !
Appie, stay strong !
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Re: 'J.C.' - The Omnipresent Oracle

Postby Cruijff » Thu Mar 24, 2016 4:06 pm

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Re: 'J.C.' - The Omnipresent Oracle

Postby Cruijff » Thu Mar 24, 2016 4:07 pm

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Re: 'J.C.' - The Omnipresent Oracle

Postby SPL » Thu Mar 24, 2016 7:17 pm

Thanks for the great pictures. I was going out earlier and just saw the headline .

Back in the early 70's watching him and total football made me fall in love with Ajax and Oranje team. My love for our beautiful club will never falter it has been touched by magic in the form of this genius. All the time Ajax is a football club his name will be mentioned.

A very sad day for our club and Dutch football.He was the greatest footballer I have ever seen and certainly the most influential.

RIP Great man . You were so very special.
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Re: 'J.C.' - The Omnipresent Oracle

Postby Manneken Pis » Thu Mar 24, 2016 7:28 pm

“If I wanted you to understand it, I would have explained it better.”
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Re: 'J.C.' - The Omnipresent Oracle

Postby Sandro » Thu Mar 24, 2016 8:35 pm

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Ik ben als een hond met een hekel aan teven, je kan niet met me fokken.
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Re: 'J.C.' - The Omnipresent Oracle

Postby Cruijff » Thu Mar 24, 2016 9:36 pm

The New York Times


Dutch Legend Cruyff Dies Aged 68


By REUTERSMARCH 24, 2016
AMSTERDAM — Johan Cruyff, one of football's greatest players and most influential and visionary coaches, died aged 68 on Thursday after a five-month battle with lung cancer.

His death was announced on his website and soon after by the De Telegraaf newspaper, for whom he wrote a weekly column that was often controversial but always eagerly anticipated.

An ex-smoker who had heart surgery in 1991, Cruyff joined Ajax Amsterdam as a long-haired teenager before emerging as one of the world's greats in the early 1970s.

He helped Ajax Amsterdam win three European Cups in a row from 1971-73 and also named European Footballer of the Year in 1971, 1973 and 1974.

Born Hendrik Johannes Cruyff, he joined Barcelona for a then world record transfer fee of $2 million, and it was Barcelona that would later define his coaching career, helping the Catalan club to win their first La Liga title in nearly 15 years in 1974.

He was also a key player in the great Netherlands team that reached the 1974 World Cup final when, for the first time, during the tournament a global audience saw him perform the now-famous "Cruyff turn" the movement in which the ​player with the ball plays it behind their own leg before swerving away in the ​direction of the ​ball.

The Dutch also got to the World Cup final but lost again in 1978, this time without Cruyff who had quit the national side, saying years later he walked away after an armed kidnap attempt.

Following stints at Los Angeles Aztecs and Washington Diplomats in the old NASL, then Levante in Spain, Cruyff returned to Ajax before ending his playing career at their bitter rivals Feyenoord in 1984.

In 1999, he was voted European Player of the Century while he is often bracketed alongside Brazil's Pele and Argentina's Diego Maradona as the three best players ever to grace the sport.

The Barca 'Dream Team' Cruyff coached won four straight La Liga titles between 1991 and 1994 and beat Sampdoria 1-0 for the club's maiden European Cup triumph in 1992.

The possession-based playing style Cruyff promoted, with an emphasis on relentless attack, has been widely copied and is credited with underpinning Barca's subsequent successes, as well as those of the Spanish national team.

Former England captain Gary Lineker, who played under Cruyff at Barcelona, summed up the Dutchman's contribution by saying on Twitter: "Football has lost a man who did more to make the beautiful game beautiful than anyone in history."

Cruyff had announced last October that he was suffering from lung cancer but continued to write his newspaper column and earlier this month travelled to Israel to visit his son Jordi, who is technical director at Maccabi Tel Aviv.

Only last month he said he was “2-0 up in the first half” of his battle against lung cancer. Poignantly that turned out to be one of the last public statements made by the man whose footballing pronouncements were eagerly sought after by football fans around the globe.

He died surrounded by friends and family at home in Barcelona, his website added.

His death prompted Dutch radio and television stations to suspend regular programming, with Ronald de Boer, another Dutch international who played at Barcelona, declaring: “He was the best footballer we ever had.”

Former Barcelona coach Pep Guardiola said: “RIP @JohanCruyff, a genius, a legend and the man who changed the mentality of the @FCBarcelona."

(Reporting by Mark Gleeson, editing by Pritha Sarkar)
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Re: 'J.C.' - The Omnipresent Oracle

Postby Cruijff » Thu Mar 24, 2016 9:38 pm

The Guardian


Johan Cruyff, who has died aged 68 of cancer, once said his qualities as a footballer were undetectable by a computer. It was surely true that a computer might have recorded his playing stats – the goals, the assists, the distances covered – but would have been incapable of assessing the wonderment generated by his technique and vision, from the late 1960s to the early 80s, first with Ajax and later with Barcelona and his national team, Holland.

With his anticipation and acceleration, Cruyff seemed to own the entire field of play. Only nominally a centre-forward, he was both orchestrator and predator, at one moment collecting a rolled ball from his keeper to start a move – one arm pointing as he barked orders to his team-mates – and the next materialising at the other end in front of goal for the coup de grace. For opponents it was like trying to pin down air. “Without Cruyff,” said Rinus Michels, his mentor and manager at Ajax, at Barcelona and with the Dutch international side, “I have no team.”

The goals he scored were ones of which no other player was capable – from twisted, one-legged, neck-high karate kicks, and from impossible angles made possible by the way he could shoot with all sides of both feet, the laces, the inside and the outside. No showreel of his talents would be complete, either, without the Cruyff turn, the trademark feint with the dropped shoulder and 180-degree swivel that broke the will of the Sweden defender Jan Olssen in the 1974 World Cup. “He was at the heart of a revolution with his football,” said Eric Cantona. “If he wanted, he could be the best player in any position on the pitch.”

Cruyff’s skills as a player brought him many honours, including nine Dutch championships, three European Cups, a Spanish league title and a World Cup runners-up medal and 48 caps for Holland between 1966 and 1977. As a manager, too, he had a highly rewarding career – winning a European Cup, two European Cup Winners’ Cups and four Spanish league titles. His philosophy and style of play made him one of the most influential figures in the history of the game.

The phrase most associated with him is “total football”, a fluid system in which no player occupies any fixed outfield role. The wider world became aware of it during the 1974 World Cup finals in West Germany. Holland were ultimately beaten in the final by the host nation but, led by Cruyff, they were indisputably the most thrilling national side of the era with, in the words of the journalist Hugh McIlvanney, “an attacking style at once so spirited and so cuttingly precise that the effect is of a cavalry charge of surgeons”. When Cruyff retired from playing and eventually moved to manage Barcelona, he created a revolutionary new style of play that became the envy of the footballing world and has been much copied.

He was born in Amsterdam, where his father, Hermanus, and mother, Nel, ran a greengrocers’ shop. Ajax was his neighbourhood club, and by the age of 10 he was on the books of its youth division, the Ajax Academy. He was 12 when his father died of a heart attack; Nel, unable to cope with running the shop on her own, got a job as a cleaner at the Ajax stadium.

Her son’s maverick intelligence did not sit well with formal learning, and he left school at 13 to become a part-time clerk for the sports clothing store Perry van der Kar, whose connection with the Ajax club allowed Cruyff to train in the mornings before reporting for work after lunch. “Uncle Henk”, the groundsman at Ajax, became his stepfather when Nel remarried. Cruyff would work alongside him in all weathers, painting lines, hoisting nets and operating tractors. Later he always took care to acknowledge a club’s subsidiary staff, the tea ladies, the people who cleaned the boots and swept the dressing rooms, as well as those who were more senior.

As a 15-year-old, Cruyff was selected as a ball boy when Benfica beat Real Madrid in the European Cup final of 1962 in Amsterdam. That day he had an epiphany, witnessing the constant, untracked movement, stamina and vision of the great Argentinian forward Alfredo Di Stéfano. Now he had a template of how the game should be played. Cruyff was given his first team debut at 17 by the then Ajax manager, Vic Buckingham, but when Michels took over he had to prove himself again. Michels, whose training regime included gruelling uphill sprints in the woods, was unimpressed by Cruyff’s chain-smoking.

But Cruyff got his chance when the regular centre-forward was out injured. Once in, he never left, becoming Michels’ trusted lieutenant. When Michels departed to manage Barcelona and the more permissive Stefan Kovács took over, Cruyff began to have an increasing influence on team selection and tactics. Ajax dominated the Eredivisie (the Dutch league) to the extent that Cruyff won six domestic titles between 1965 and 1973. They also became the masters of Europe, bringing home the European Cup for three consecutive years between 1971 and 1973.

By that time Cruyff had become Europe’s first football superstar, indelibly memorable with his personalised Puma boots and No 14 shirt. Managed by his father-in-law, Cor Koster, a diamond and watch merchant whose daughter, Danny, Cruyff had married in 1968, his clout was so great that he was even allowed to sport twin stripes on his Holland shirt rather than the trademark three of Adidas, the Dutch team’s kit sponsor.

In 1973 Cruyff transferred to Barcelona, beginning a long and sometimes stormy relationship with the club. In his first season there, reunited with Michels, he dragged them from the doldrums of La Liga to their first championship for 13 years, via a 27-match unbeaten run that included a 5-0 away win over Real Madrid. Cruyff’s status as “El Salvador” was set in stone when he named his third child Jordi after Catalonia’s patron saint.

Michels’ return to Ajax left Cruyff as the most powerful personality at Barcelona, often bending the will of the club president, José Luis Núñez, to support him rather than the manager, Hennes Weisweiler, even when he was in the wrong. With his legacy established in the form of La Masia, a training academy that was later to nurture Cesc Fàbregas and Lionel Messi, and laid the foundations of Spain’s international dominance between 2008 and 2012, he planned to retire at 31. Instead, fate planted a tripwire when he was conned out of a large part of his fortune by a friend and business associate and was forced to extend his playing career with a peripatetic few years between the US, Spain and the Netherlands. He won two more Eredivisie titles, with Ajax in 1981-82 and 1982-83, and another with Feyenoord, where he spent his final season before retiring in 1984.

Cruyff’s shift into management was inevitable, though in 1985, when Ajax took him on, he had yet to receive his coaching badges and for two years had the job title of technical adviser. Under his leadership Ajax won the Dutch cup twice and beat Lokomotiv Leipzig in the 1987 European Cup Winners’ Cup final. In 1988 he moved to manage Barcelona, establishing a new way of playing that was all about maintaining possession through short passes and movement – the style that came to be known as tiki-taka. He liked to work individually with each player, finding out what made him tick. He converted a young Pep Guardiola from winger to midfield fulcrum, convinced him he could defend as well as spray passes, and fast-tracked him into the first team; Guardiola repaid him by becoming his disciple, following on from him as Barcelona manager.

Not everyone was a convert to tiki-taka, but the team Cruyff constructed, which included Michael Laudrup, Hristo Stoichkov and Ronald Koeman, became the best in Spanish football, winning La Liga four times between 1991 and 1994, as well as the 1992 European Cup. In the middle of all this Cruyff underwent heart surgery, the penalty of several decades of smoking. The 11 trophies he won in all made him, at the time, Barcelona’s most successful manager, but in his final two seasons no more came their way, and in 1996 he was sacked by Núñez.

He went on to create the Johan Cruyff Foundation, which has provided more than 200 pitches in 22 countries for children of all backgrounds to play together, and he received the Uefa Grassroots award in 2009, the same year he took on a two-year spell as manager of the Catalonia national team. By that time he had grown increasingly disappointed with the playing style of Holland’s national side, and spoke in typically forthright terms of what he called “the ugly path” they took in the final of the 2010 World Cup, in which they lost to Spain. Many noted that Spain took the main prize with a kind of football that had been inspired by Cruyff at Barcelona many years before.

He is survived by Danny, by his daughters Chantal and Susila, and by Jordi, who played football for Barcelona and Manchester United.

• Johan (Hendrik Johannes) Cruyff, footballer, born 25 April 1947; died 24 March 2016
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Re: 'J.C.' - The Omnipresent Oracle

Postby Cruijff » Fri Mar 25, 2016 12:39 am

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Re: 'J.C.' - The Omnipresent Oracle

Postby aveslacker » Fri Mar 25, 2016 1:36 am

Terrible news. I'm almost never emotional when an athlete dies, but this has me very sad.
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Re: 'J.C.' - The Omnipresent Oracle

Postby rjf1 » Fri Mar 25, 2016 3:55 am

One of the all time greats has died, but the legacy he left will always be with us.
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